Financial Literacy and Education for Children

It’s back to school time…so how do you teach your kids dollars and sense?

Are your children prepared to manage money and save for the future? Do you take the time to teach them about the value of a dollar and the difference between needs and wants?

According to the Council for Economic Education, despite the recognition that financial literacy is critical to succeed in modern society, study after study show that many Americans continue to lack basic understanding of financial concepts, often resulting in dire consequences. Yet there is hope for improvement if we work to make financial education a priority in our schools.

With little financial education in schools today, the role of financial educator generally falls to the parent. So, be prepared! Be sure to look into the financial education services offered at Wauna Credit Union.

A recent article in Parents Magazine states that “5- and 6-year-olds are starting to develop the cognitive skills necessary to understand basic monetary concepts, such as identifying coins, figuring out how to count change, and matching small amounts of money to items they want to buy.” How do we start teaching our young ones about money?

Meet one father of four and a financial planner with CUNA Mutual Group, Phillip Hansen, who says the earlier you start educating your children, the better. He has some great advice for teaching young kids the value of physical money, setting goals, earning enough to reach goals, as well as the concept of opportunity costs. An ‘opportunity cost,’ for example, is if you spend time and money going to a movie, you cannot spend that time at home reading a book, and you can’t spend the money on something else.

“One of the first things I’ve taught my 5-year-old twins is that money is an actual, physical thing that they can earn and save and choose how they want to spend,” says Hansen. “It’s confusing for kids to see us plop down a plastic credit or debit card, as it creates a false sense that money isn’t real and if I want something, I just pull out the piece of plastic. So, we teach our kids that they can do chores around the house to earn money and then save it for items they are passionate about.”

Hansen recommends:

  • Talking to kids about the physical concept of money and handing money directly to the cashier when buying something
  • Allowing them the opportunity to do small, age-appropriate chores around the house to earn money
  • Giving them a glass jar to save money and watch the savings grow
  • Helping them set goals for their money, like saving for a special new toy
A little WCU member saving $$

Understanding the concept of opportunity costs, where they understand you may have to choose between things like a new toy or going to the movies

“Learning opportunity costs is one of the most important life concepts; opportunity costs are in everything in life—if I buy these really cool shoes, then I cannot have that new video game; or if I choose this college degree over that degree, will it bring me as much enjoyment?” says Hansen. “Teaching the value of money, goal setting, and helping kids understand what’s important to them is really Financial Literacy and Education for Children How to teach your kids dollars and sense to life in general. It’s the first step to helping them succeed and make informed decisions.” So, what else can parents do to teach kids about the value of money and making choices?

We’ve made a list:

  • Discuss what money is and how it works
  • Engage in family discussions about how you want to spend the money, where to vacation, and what to give up to get there
  • Look for teachable moments
  • Give an allowance or let them earn money
  • Start a savings account at a credit union
  • Set a savings goal
  • Teach them to budget—how do I make it until my next allowance?
  • Visit a credit union with your child
  • Let them struggle a bit
  • Be a good example

“My kids are still very young but I’ve already started helping my 5-year-olds understand the value of an hour of work—they cannot really understand the concept of a dollar, but if we talk about how many hours of chores it would take to buy a certain toy, they get it,” says Hansen. “I help my clients understand this notion as well—and whether they can really afford to buy that new house or if they should hunker down for a few more years and save up for the dream home with a little more planning.”

Hansen also says he helps a lot of parents understand that they don’t need to pay for everything for their kids—it’s so important to teach them responsibility and discipline around money and having a little ‘skin in the game.’ What is the difference between your wants and your needs? He says without a good, solid grasp of the value of money and its power, kids have a sense of entitlement that could become the root cause of struggle and brutal reality checks when they hit the real world.

“It simply is never too early to prepare your children to understand money, how it works, and all of the opportunity costs associated with making decisions and life choices,” says Hansen. “Those lessons provide the foundation for a happy and fulfilled life.”

The Capitol One hack: What you need to know

Unfortunately, we live in a world where data security simply isn’t as secure as it should be. And this week, we’ve learned of yet another major breach. A hack at Capital One has exposed the information of millions of consumers in the U.S. and Canada. The hack represents another in a long list of data leaks over only a few years. Luckily, there are things you can do to protect yourself.

What we know

  • A 33-year-old Seattle resident, named Paige Thompson, gained access to over 100 million Capital One accounts and credit card applications
    • Thompson worked for Amazon Web Services, the cloud hosting company that Capital One was using
  • 140,000 Social Security numbers, 1 million Canadian Social Insurance numbers and 80,000 bank account numbers, in addition to an undisclosed number of people’s names, addresses, credit scores, credit limits, balances, and other information, have been compromised
    • Thompson was able to gain access by exploiting a misconfigured web application firewall
    • She was arrested on 07/29/19
  • Capital One said the hack occurred March 22 and 23, 2019 and includes credit card applications as far back as 2005
  • The company says it has repaired the exposure and that it is “unlikely the information was used for fraud or disseminated by this individual”

What you can do

  • If you hold or have ever held an account with Capitol One, watch for alerts
    • The company is reaching out to consumers they know have been impacted
    • Do not reply to any emails or phone-calls relating to this breach as they may be phishing scams
    • Contact Capitol One directly
  • Sign up for a credit monitoring service
  • Set up fraud alerts on all of your credit and debit cards and accounts
  • Check all of your financial statements regularly
  • View our Identity Theft Toolkit: http://bit.ly/2wO6Dy0
  • Capital One has set up a dedicated web page at https://www.capitalone.com/facts2019/ for information regarding the recent breach

How it happened

  • Thompson claimed to use a special command to extract files in a Capital One directory stored on Amazon’s servers
  • The FBI believes Thompson tweeted that she wanted to distribute Social Security numbers along with full names and dates of birth
  • Someone who saw the information online notified Capital One of the leaked data
    • Capital One notified the FBI, who then searched Thompson’s residence on 07/29/19

The safety and security of our member accounts and personal information is the highest priority at Wauna Credit Union. Keeping member accounts safe and secure is also a shared responsibility. It’s important for members to review their periodic account statements when received and report any suspicious activity immediately to the Credit Union. Working together, we can increase the opportunities to protect the financial interests of our members and the Credit Union.

If you have additional questions or concerns about the security of your information, you are always welcome to contact us at your convenience.

Tips for Scoring Cheap Summer Getaways

Everybody likes a summer vacation, but travel can be expensive. If you’re looking to squeeze one more getaway into your budget before summer ends, our financial aces here at Wauna Credit Union have some tips for traveling on the cheap and getting the best deals.

Go in the Off-Season

During the hottest summer months, business at popular vacation spots like Arizona and New Mexico tends to slow down dramatically. If you can take the heat, you can score some great deals at premium resorts, golf courses, and other attractions during the off-season. Just remember that the off-season is also when many of these places perform annual maintenance and major construction projects. If, for example, a pool is important to you, make sure the resort you’re visiting won’t be renovating it while you’re there.

Buy a Package

When considering a last-minute getaway, travel packages that combine flights, hotel, and sometimes meals, can be the best deals out there. The key is to be flexible on where and when to go.

Get the App for That

These days, there’s a travel app or website for pretty much everything – including the lowest-priced flights, hotels, and travel packages. A few to consider include Kayak, Hipmunk, Momondo, Airfare Watchdog, and Skyscanner. Each has a slightly different focus, so try out several to see which ones work best for your needs. Keep in mind that some of these sites do not carry regional airlines, which often have good deals. And, when you do find a great flight deal, take a look at the airline’s website, since some deals are only available when you book direct.

Get Social

Just as some deals are only available when you book direct, some travel operators offer special deals for those who follow them on social media. The best deals go fast, so follow your favorites on Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe to their promotional email lists. If you live in a smaller town, you could save by driving to a major city where flights are generally cheaper. By the same token, if you live in or are flying to a metropolis like Los Angeles, be sure to look to smaller airports like Burbank, Ontario and Long Beach. They may be slightly less convenient, but many low fare carriers favor these regional airports because their fees are often lower.

Capitalize on the Strong Dollar

If you’ve avoided historically- expensive destinations like Japan, now’s your opportunity to visit and cross them off your bucket list. The strong dollar means exchange rates are favorable, and your money will go farther. If you want to stay closer to home, travel gurus also recommend Canada, since it’s 40% cheaper than it was a year ago.

Wauna Credit Union Raises Big Bucks for Food for Kids Program

Communities are brought together by many hands, many hardships, and lots of love. For the Food for Kids Program at the St. Vincent de Paul Food Pantry in Astoria, Oregon, it’s no different.

“Last year we put together 2,246 food bags, which puts us just under 13,000 lbs of food provided to our community,” says Pantry volunteer, Janet Wilker.

In just six years, the little pantry located at the Saint Mary’s Star of the Sea Church, has given away over 10,000 food bags. The bags, filled with groceries and provisions, are then given to area individuals and families alike, but more specifically, the children.

“Every now and then we run into a parent who thanks us for being there for their family,” said Lorrie Radu, also a Pantry volunteer. “We like to think of it as delivering a little bag of hope every Friday.”

From left: Kristen DeForrest of WCU, and Lorrie Radu and Janet Wilker of the St. Vincent de Paul Food Panty.

Employees of area financial cooperative, Wauna Credit Union (WCU), choose one charity or non-profit organization within to raise funds toward. This round, they selected the Food for Kids Program. The Credit Union managed to raise over $6,500 for the Pantry. WCU Compliance Specialist, Kristen DeForrest helped coordinate the fundraising efforts.

“Our employees care about giving back to our communities and that’s why we chose the Food for Kids program,” said DeForrest. “I know this food makes a tremendous impact on the students’ ability to learn and grow, and we hope others will join us in supporting this very worthy cause,” she said

St. Vincent de Paul Food Pantry is located at 1465 Grand Ave., Astoria, OR 97103 and is open Tuesdays from 1 to 3 pm and Friday through Saturday from 10 am to noon. They may be reached by phone at (503) 325-2007.

Teach your kids dollars and cents this National Credit Union Youth Month

If you’ve been meaning to talk to your kids about money, April is the perfect time to start. In addition to National Credit Union Youth Month, April also marks National Teach a Child to Save Day. So, in the spirit of occasion, here are three real-world experiences that parents can use to introduce kids to personal finance.

Have your children make purchases
Purchasing something is perhaps the most direct way to understand how money works. Therefore, it’s a great opportunity for your children. Try including them the next time you make a purchase.

Whether it’s at the supermarket or movie theater, give your kids cash to hand to the cashier, and then have them collect and count the change.

Lesson: Money is used in exchange for goods and services.

Open a savings account with them
There’s no better way to explain saving money to a child than to open an account in their name for this specific purpose.

Show them an actual Wauna Credit Union branch, point out our new Virtual Teller Machines and ATMs, and have them meet our staff. Reinforce the roles that financial institutions play in managing money. After the account is open, create a plan together for making regular deposits.

Additionally, throughout April, Wauna Credit Union will deposit the first $5 for all new Youth Jump Start Club Accounts. Members can also enter to win cash prizes by making deposits! Learn more here.

Lesson: While piggy banks are cute, savings accounts are the best option for stashing your cash.

Inspire them to start a business
There’s a reason why lemonade stands have stood the test of time. These micro businesses represent many children’s first exposure to earning money. If lemonade’s not their thing, encourage them to offer pet sitting or yard work to your neighbors.

Lesson: Money is earned through work.

Our young members have limitless potential, and financial education from Wauna Credit Union can be instrumental in helping them achieve it. Swing by one of our branches and celebrate National Credit Union Youth Month.

By staying true to credit union philosophy in an engaging new way, we can set our young members on the path to financial education, understanding and security. We look forward to seeing you — and your future — soon!

Financial Benefits of Membership at a Credit Union

Guess what?

Credit unions provide all of the financial services you need: savings accounts, loans, financial education, credit cards, online and mobile banking, and more. The “more” part is the best part, because it represents your benefits as a member.

Okay, so what’s the difference between a credit union and a bank?

The key difference between local credit unions and other financial services is that we are owned by members like you. Unlike for-profit financial institutions, which take their marching-orders from stockholders, we exist only to serve you and your financial needs. You’re the boss! With no Wall Street fat-cats to pay, we are uniquely positioned to return direct financial benefits to members. This includes better interest rates and lower fees.

But what does that mean to you?

In 2018 alone, Oregon credit unions provided a whopping $152 million in direct financial benefits to over 2 million members. That’s the equivalent of about $75 per member, and $160 per household. Financing a $25,000 new automobile for 60 months at an Oregon credit union saves you an average of $177 in annual interest compared to what you would pay at the nearby bank.

How do credit union members benefit?

Do you want more examples of the benefits of belonging to a credit union? How does earning a better return on your savings sound? 2018 also saw the collective member benefit from higher interest rates on savings at more than $3.6 million. We supported local spending to the tune of $333 million. Not to mention a $1.8 billion boost to the Oregon economy.

And the list goes on…

  • In the Northwest, 6.5 million consumers have discovered the Credit Union Difference.
  • Nearly everyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in Idaho, Oregon, or Washington is eligible to join a credit union. Learn more by visiting www.asmarterchoice.org.
  • Credit unions provide jobs to 19,600 of your Northwest neighbors—2,520 in Idaho, 5,850 in Oregon, and 12,200 in Washington.
  • Oregon alone supported more than $802 million in total income to working Oregonians.
  • Credit unions earn a corporate tax exemption because they are not-for-profit cooperatives that return earnings to their members.
  • Giving back to the community is part of the Credit Union DNA.
  • You’re treated like you truly belong—because you’re more than a number—you’re a member.
  • Credit unions live by Northwest values: local, cooperative, community based.

To learn even more about how credit unions support the Pacific Northwest, visit OregonLovesCreditUnions.com. Find out why 50 percent of Oregonians have chosen credit unions as their financial services partners.

Wauna Credit Union is also a very safe place for you to save money. The National Credit Union Association insures all deposits up to at least $250,000 per individual.

So, spread the good word! Tell your friends to join a credit union today!

All analysis provided by economists at ECONorthwest, a highly regarded economic consulting firm.   

Five habits that can ruin your budget

BudgetingSo you’ve set a budget and on paper it looks fabulous. You’ve created different spending categories and what seem like reasonable limits. Yet, somehow it just doesn’t quite work month after month. Sound familiar? It’s frustrating, but there are fixes.

The first thing to do is double check that your budget is reasonable, given factors like income and goals. If everything looks set up for success, then ask yourself if any of the following habits are derailing your master-plan:

1. Impulse purchases
If you’re prone to buying items on a whim, this might be your culprit. Even if it’s a coffee a day or pack of gum every time you’re standing in line at the check out counter, those costs add up. It’s an even bigger problem if you can’t walk into a store without buying all the amazing things, whether you need them or not. The key thing to think on is want vs. need.

2. Blurring the line between needs and wants
All budgets are loosely based on allotting your spending between needs (mortgage, bills) and wants (entertainment, eating out). In theory, the division between the two categories is clear. However, in the moment, the line can get blurry.

For example, you might justify treating yourself to dinner at a restaurant because you had the worst day ever, even if the meal is going to exceed your “eating out” limits for the week or month. Remember, budgets don’t have to be a bummer. Allow yourself small adjustments here and there, but be sure everything adds up. If you spend more in one category, spend less in another. Easy peasy.

3. Not tracking your spending
Unless you can remember every single purchase you make throughout a budget cycle, review your spending regularly. If it’s hard to work this task into your normal routine, set a schedule for yourself, e.g. every three days, spend two minutes looking at your checking account activity. Super tip: setting reminders on your phone is an easy way to make this a recurring event. With our U-Banking platform, there are plenty of awesome savings tools you can start using today.

Whenever you see an expense you don’t remember or didn’t plan, make sure you add it to your total costs for the week, month, or whatever timeline you’ve set.

4. Failing to comparison shop
If you always take the first deal you find when shopping, you’re probably spending more than you have to. Next time, do a little comparison shopping to see if there’s a better offer. This is especially true if you’re buying online. With the intense competition between online retailers, it’s always worth your time to shop around for better prices.

5. You don’t automate your savings
Putting money into your savings account may be the most important part of your budget. However, if you transfer it manually, you may forget or avoid doing it because you’ve over-spent in other areas.

SavingsThe solution? Set up recurring transfers from your checking to your savings account through U-Banking. Designate a day (preferably just after you get paid) and a predetermined amount, then let technology do the rest. That way, you’ll always hit your savings goals every month.

Budgeting doesn’t have to be a chore or something you frown over. With a few thoughts and easy steps, you’ll smile when you notice the extra bucks at the end of your timeline.

Reducing Seasonal Energy Costs

Brrrr! For many of us, winter means high energy bills, but sitting in the dark or turning off the heat are not your only options. Here are some ways to improve your home’s energy efficiency and save money during the cold months:

Sealing

Cold air can get in around the sides of windows, doors, and vents. If you hold a piece of tissue near the inside frames on a windy day and it flutters, you should seal the window. Visit your local hardware store for weather-stripping. Talk to an employee or do research online about the right product.

Insulation

Insulating your attic can increase your home’s energy efficiency significantly, and it’s usually fairly easy. Consult with a professional or do some research at the Zip-Code Insulation Program, created by the Department of Energy.

Heating and Cooling Systems

Temperature systems account for about 56% of the energy in a typical U.S. home, so updating can save a lot. You can retrofit or replace your furnace or boiler, depending how long your system has to live and how much each option costs. New heating systems can achieve an efficiency of up to 97%.

Appliances and Electronics

Appliances account for 20% of energy use in a typical U.S. home. Old ones can be energy hogs. To find energy-efficient products, look for the Energy Star label.

Water Heaters

Insulating or increasing the insulation on your water heater tank and pipes can decrease heat loss and lower your energy bills for a fraction of the price of replacing your water heater. However, if your water heater is nearing the end of its life, it is probably a good idea to replace it.

Solar Panels

Solar panels typically have high upfront costs, though they can provide clean, free energy for years to come. Use the Solar Calculator to estimate the cost of installing panels.

Financing

Many cities and states have programs to help pay for green renovations. Contact Wauna Credit Union to find a low-interest loan. You may also qualify for tax benefits; visit the IRS’s website at www.irs.gov.

Energy usage and efficiency figures come from the Department of Energy. For more facts and tips, visit www.energysavers.gov.

Scam alert: Important info regarding my mortgage?

Image result for mortgage scam postcards

Mysterious postcards are showing up in mailboxes all over the country and they’ve started hitting home. This “time-sensitive” matter has many of us scratching our heads and saying, “huh?” Well, guess what? They’re 100%, for sure, mortgage scams.

So, what the heck are they?

Let’s address the elephant in the room and put to rest that these did NOT come from Wauna Credit Union — in fact, they did not originate from any financial institution. Recipients are urged to contact a toll-free number (after doing some digging, these postcards have listed 855-901-9227, 800-230-8750, 888-405-0963, and 855-549-212) regarding a recently closed WCU mortgage.

Where are they coming from?

Whether or not you have indeed recently closed on a WCU mortgage (congratulations if you have!) companies from all over the world have the ability to purchase your information if it has been publicly listed (sometimes even if it hasn’t been!) But your first giveaway should be that the Mortgage ID number provided is bogus.

Often times, scammers will pull what’s called the “phantom help” maneuver, where they’ll encourage you to reduce or even stop your mortgage payments while they work to lessen your costs (for a moderate fee, of course). Unfortunately, by the time you realize you’re being taken advantage of, the phantom helper is long gone.

If you look reeeeeeally closely in the bottom right-hand corner of the examples we’ve provided, you’ll see a “All information provided by H.W.C.” and a “Not affiliated with…” disclosure. Problem is you can grow old searching for information about H.W.C. and come back with nothing solid. We’ve also seen loandepot.com, Heritage Warranty Company, and Mortgage Protection Services, only none of these are legitimate businesses.

Conduct a quick online search for “Mortgage Protection Services” and you’ll find they have an ‘F’ rating with Better Business Bureau, hundreds of thousands of complaints on Ripoff Report, and even have Cease and Desist orders from several states, including Illinois and Massachusetts.

We called the number!

Image result for mortgage scam postcardsDarn right we called the number. In fact, we tried all the numbers we were able to find. Some connect to a live person, others are recordings, and one dialed directly to an automated system. Regardless of which number, we were eventually probed for personal information. Funny enough, these fraudsters refuse to give out any information about themselves, or even the actual company they are working with.

To be clear: Wauna Credit Union will NEVER ask for your social security number, passwords, or other sensitive information via postcard or over the phone.

So, how do I protect myself against these postcards?

It never feels good to be the target of a scam, but unfortunately it happens to us all. Should one of these end up in your mailbox, recycle it. Do not call the number. Do not play their games. Toss it and forget it. Remember, Wauna Credit Union will not send you notifications like this. If you are ever uncertain, contact us right away.

Onto protecting you from the next scam!

Protect yourself this holiday shopping season

As your credit union, we want to help you make the most of your time and money during the holidays while keeping your financial information safe and secure. Smart shopping strategies can also keep your finances from going “into the red” on Black Friday.

This, the busiest shopping day of the year, signals the start of the holiday shopping season — and it promises to be robust. With low unemployment and increased consumer confidence, the National Retail Federation reports that Americans are expected to increase spending by 4.5 percent over last year, shelling out an average of $1,007 this holiday season.

Even if you don’t plan to spend thousands of those hard-earned dollars, the following tips will help you find the best bang for your buck, encourage safe shopping habits, and keep your finances going from black to red when shopping for deals and holiday steals.

 

Preparation is key:

  • Use a budget—and stick to it. Decide ahead of time how much you want to spend on your Black Friday shopping spree and do your best to resist impulse buying — especially if you’re not sure how good a specific deal is. Black Friday sales, including door-buster specials, are designed to get you into a store so that the retailer can sell you something else.
  • Make a list. The holidays are an exciting time, and it can be easy to get carried away. Making a list might keep you from buying something that’s beyond your budget.
  • Start early. You can no longer count on checking the ads in the Sunday paper to get the best deals. To judge how good a sale may be, you’ll need to track the deals leading up to Black Friday and Cyber Monday, too.
  • Know before you go. Study the ads — in print and online — the weekend before Thanksgiving.
  • Check one of the Black Friday websites. You’ll find tons of leaked Black Friday ads like net and blackfriday.gottadeal.com.

 Gather your tools:

  • Use tech to comparison shop. You don’t have to go retailer-by-retailer to compare prices. Try Google Shopping and services like NexTag. Apps such as ShopSavvy and Shopkick let you scan bar codes or QR codes to compare prices, get discounts, and score coupons.
  • Check the retailers’ apps. Many Black Friday sites have their own apps but so do the big guys like Amazon, Best Buy, and Walmart. Amazon’s app, for example, lets you use a smartphone camera to scan products and price-shop online.
  • Use loyalty programs. Stores with loyalty programs may offer sales and promotions to their members first, then let them earn rewards on what they buy. Black Friday shopping alerts can get you first dibs on promotions, coupons, and discounts.
  • Get social. The Facebook pages and Twitter feeds of your favorite retailers are a great way to find out about deals and promotions. Retailers will often reward customers who like or follow them with special alerts to Black Friday discounts and incentives.
  • Check the store’s policies. Almost all of the major retailers have some form of price-match policy, but some stores might suspend their price-match guarantees during the Black Friday weekend on certain items, so read the fine print.

Other money-saving options:

  • Try an older model. When buying electronics, consider older versions that may have been the latest and greatest just a few months ago.
  • Track your spending. Review your account statements, pay bills regularly, and monitor your accounts through online banking.
  • Use your talents. Give a homemade gift of baked goods, mason jar mixes, or art. Homemade gifts can cost a fraction of a similar item from a store.
  • Use Credit Card Reward Programs. Consider a WCU VISA Rewards card and earn big, big points. You’re spending money regardless, so give yourself something in return and save $$ on a lower interest rate over the big banks.

Strategies to safeguard your credit and debit card purchases:

At the store…

  • At the cash register, protect your PIN by blocking the keypad from the view of cashiers or other customers.
  • Some non-metal keypads have heat sensors that are active for several minutes. Infrared cameras on smartphones can be used to obtain your PIN. We suggest resting your fingers on other keys as you enter your PIN. May seem silly, but better safe than sorry.

When shopping online…

  • Do not use public wireless networks for online purchases.
  • Shop on trusted sites with https:// in the URL. Be sure an icon with a lock appears to the left. The “s” stands for “secure” and indicates communication with a site that is encrypted.
  • Type the merchant’s address directly into your browser; avoid links.
  • Use complicated passwords with at least eight characters. Include numbers, special characters, and upper- and lower-case numbers.
  • Keep the operating system, antivirus, and security software updated on your computers and mobile devices.

Set yourself up for success:

  • Use our online account monitoring service through U-Banking and report any suspicious activity to us right away.
  • Keep a list of all card account numbers in a safe place, so you can report it immediately if they are lost or stolen.
  • We recommend that you don’t store your payment information on shopping sites or shopping apps.
  • Increase your account security by linking your debit card to a secondary account rather than your main account. Or, opt to use credit cards exclusively for purchases.

The gift of a brighter financial future

Give yourself the gift of a brighter financial future this holiday season. Take education classes or look for low interest loans to help you achieve your financial dreams in the coming year. Stop by a branch or visit us online for possibilities. With the safety and security of Wauna Credit Union at your back, this is sure to be a wonderful holiday season!